Friday, October 14, 2011

How to Love Mythology

Mythology is the collection of stories, fables, legends, and myths from a particular culture[1]. It often uses supernatural origins to explain events and occurences. Read on to learn now to foster a love of mythology.

Steps

  1. Decide what culture of mythology you are interested in. Cultures may include Greece, Rome, Egypt, the Vikings, Native Americans, and every religion. Any and every place in the world has its own mythology.
  2. Research common myths for your culture of choice. Both fiction and nonfiction books can discuss mythology.
  3. Play games. There are many games based on mythology, such as Age of Mythology, and the Age of Empires series. Online role-playing games based on mythology can be fun and still very informative.
  4. Write your own mythology-based stories.

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Sources and Citations

  1. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mythology


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How to Read Egyptian Hieroglyphics


Here is how to pronounce and read hieroglyphics. This won't teach you how to write yet, though. You would need pictures. But this guide should get you started.

Steps

  1. Learn the alphabet. There are more than 26 alphabets in the Egyptian Language. This is because some letters have accents. This is why Ka, from Chephren should never be confused with Ka, meaning the soul protector.(Plural is Kau from Men Kau Ra (Mycerinus)).
  2. Know how to pronounce it. Eg. An a with a pointy hat accent on top is pronounced as an a from Ahli, an "a" from your throat. A normal "a" however, is pronounced like a normal a.
  3. Read from where the bird looks. If the birds' head is looking left, you read from left to right. If the bird looks right, read from right to left.
  4. Read the god's name last. Chephren, the owner of the second pyramid of Giza, his name in Egyptian is Ka F Ra (Rise of Ra) His name consists of a horned viper(F), two curved lines leaning over each other(ka), and a Sun with a dot.(Ra)
  5. Understand that vowels have no meaning. If you were writing a name such as Henry, you would write in Egyptian HNNRY. The vowels E and I are not used so much.
  6. Pay attention to titles. If you were to say someone was the king of upper and lower Egypt as well as a good or beautiful god, you would say NSUT BT, -=NAME=- NTR NFR/NFR NTR.
  7. Know your numerals. The numbber system was easy. One was | two was || three was ||| and so on. 10 was an upside down U shape, 20 was two upside down u shapes and so on, twenty five would be two Upside down U shapes and five of "|" and so on. 100 is like a whirlpool from birds eye view, so 125 was a whirlpool like thing, two U shapes and five of "|". 1000 was a semicirle at the bottom, then a stick extending out of it followed by what looks like pac-man at the top. 10000 was a bent stick, and 100000 was a frog.
  8. Manage the months. "Year" in Egyptian was RNPIT and Month was EBD day was HRU you would describe moths in years by the reign of the king. So: RNPT DWAW EBD KEMT Smut HRU PESJ Xer hem n NST BT User Maat ra Setep N Ra Sa Ra Ra Meses Meri Amun means In the ninth day of the third moth of Season Smut (pronounced SHMUT) ie. Autumn, Under the fifth year of the majesty of Ramses II the son of ra, beloved of Amun. Then you put stuff after that. Good year is RNPT NFR and good day would be HRU NFR.

Tips

  • Know the determinatives. Baqet, meaning land of trees, consists of only one letter but two determinatives. The letter is a loaf, or a semicircle, which is 'T' but also has a tree, which determines it has trees, and a Circle with an 'X' inside, which determines it is a city. All determinatives are the same, but have no pronunciation. Without the determinatives, Baqet would be t.
    • Know how much there is. Ramses the second was known as User Maat Ra Setep n Ra. The determinatives in there are numerous. Can you guess which one is not a Determinative?
    • Names have definition. Tutankhamen's name is Emen Tut Ankh. It also has three determinatives at the end. His Whole name means Living Image Of Amun.
  • Two Kingdoms. The old and the new kingdom have different Alphabet, so watch out.
  • If you want some extra vocab, go to a Egyptian Dictionary. There aren't many but visit the one in the external links.
  • "X" in any word for an Egyptologist, is pronounced as KH

Related wikiHows


Sources and Citations


How to Rent a Camel in Cairo

Perhaps you've ridden a camel in the past-at the zoo or county fair. Whether you have or you haven't, long-distance camel riding is an experience that is unique to the Middle East. If you're planning a trip to Cairo, don't miss your opportunity to join the minority of people who have ridden a camel through the pyramids. Before you go, however, you should know a little bit more about how to rent a camel in Cairo.

Steps

  1. Travel from Cairo to the Giza Pyramids. The Cairo camel rental process begins with a ride to the Pyramids. The pyramid site is approximately 14 miles (23 km) from Cairo International Airport (CAI). Inexpensive, air-conditioned buses are available about every 20 minutes. You may also take a taxi from nearly anywhere in the city. You're less likely to have to haggle for a better price in the yellow taxis or on a bus than in the black-and-white taxis.
  2. Determine your budget. A trip on a pre-arranged tour is more expensive than a walk-up trip. Your package tour may also include a camel-riding experience.
    • If you're planning to go on a professional tour of Egypt and the Middle East, check with the tour operator to determine if the tour includes a tour of the pyramids by camelback. If it does, someone else will handle the legwork for you. This is certainly the easiest, though also the most expensive option for renting a camel in Cairo.
    • Several companies offer advance reservations for day trips that include camel-riding pyramid tours. These packages often include transportation from Cairo, several hours of camel riding, refreshments, and a tour guide. They tend to cost around US$100, but are usually reputable.
    • You can hire a camel after you have arrived at the pyramids. Be wary. Camel rental agencies have reputations of trying to take advantage of unsuspecting tourists. Some stories involve forcing people who rent a camel to pay a second fee to get off of the camel or repeatedly placing costume pieces (such as a Lawrence of Arabia-style turban) onto a renter just before taking a picture, and then asking for a "costume-rental fee."
  3. Be ready to bargain. Like many services in Cairo, camel rental gets cheaper the better you are at bargaining. You should expect to pay around 40 Egyptian Pounds (US$7) for an on-site camel rental, though good prices range from 30 to 50 Egyptian Pounds ($5-8).

Tips

  • Tourist police wear black uniforms and are easy to find. If you experience harassment from a camel rental agent, make an immediate report to the tourist police.

Warnings

  • Camels are wild animals and can be dangerous. They also make loud noises and can smell bad.

Sources and Citations




How to Enjoy a Museum


Enjoying a museum visit means finding out what works for you when you go. There are so many possible ways to keep yourself entertained in a wide variety of museums, that there is bound to be something that takes your fancy and enlivens the visit for you. Follow these steps, and you'll be prepared.
Note that this article covers both the generalities of planning to ensure an entertaining visit, as well as giving the specifics of visiting some types of museums.

Contents

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Steps

Preparation
  1. Being prepared is really important for ensuring your enjoyment at a museum. Doing a little research and planning in advance will give you a heads up as to what is worth seeing and doing and will help you to make the most of your time at the museum. It will also help you decide whether or not it's best to break down the visit into a series of visits, something that is possible if it's your local museum.
  2. Decide what museum you will visit. There are so many different types of museum in existence, that you'd be hard pressed not to find one that pleases you. There are museums for art, information, re-enactments, military and war, transportation, science, open air, virtual and zoos.[1] Select one that excites your curiosity and you're halfway to having an enjoyable visit!
  3. Do some research before visiting.[2] Most museums now have online portals which allow you to explore the museum virtually. When looking up your chosen museum, look for such things as:
    • The exhibits - see what is on exhibit at the museum at all times, as well as special exhibitions being held for a short time.
    • The history of the museum - there will often be very interesting stories about the artifacts, benefactors, etc., that can make your visit all the more interesting.
    • Activities - see whether there are talks, displays, tours, special activities that will happening on the day that you visit. Many museums hold regular activities that meet all age group interests.
    • Fees, food and storage - although mundane, it's important to know how much the visit will cost, whether or not you can eat there, and whether or not there is storage for coats, bags, etc. You might also need to check about stroller and wheelchair access or hire, and find out about out transportation needs and car parking.
  4. Be prepared to learn at least one thing on your visit. It is always good to take away something new from your visit.
  5. Plan rest and refreshment breaks into your visit. Long periods of walking around, standing and interacting with displays can be wearying after a while; it is important to take breaks and to re-energize. This will provide you with a good opportunity to take stock of what you have seen and what else you might want to do in the museum, helping you to stay focused to avoid aimless wandering.
  6. Take a friend or two. Visiting museums is always a lot more fun when you are with someone else to share the experience with and to talk over what you're seeing. A friend also brings another perspective when you talk about what you see amongst yourselves.
  7. Think broadly. Really take a broad look at things see the big picture and then the small. Try to find out what the artist, builder, writer, or whatever, was thinking when they made their work. What was the maker trying to tell you?
Art Museums
  1. Art museums can be a great deal of fun provided you go with an open mind and don't expect to see the mass produced marketing imagery you see in the rest of your everyday life. Keeping an open mind about art can lead you to discover how centuries of people have thought, lived, and played before us. And one day, it'll be our lifestyles on those canvases, installations, and displays that people will stand gazing at too -- quite a grounding realization! If you're taking children to an art museum, it's a good idea to introduce them to online activities as well, to help them learn more about art, both before and after the visit.[3]
  2. Take it slowly. Learning to love art is a process, not necessarily an instantaneous reaction. Be prepared to take the time to look around, and to react in your own way. If somebody knowledgeable about the art is helping you, that can be great but it can also make you feel that you don't know anything - if that happens, just let them know that you need to discover the art in your own way before having too many details given to you.
  3. Try to find out what the artist was seeking to say in his or her pictures. Instead of just staring at the Mona Lisa in blank awe, determine what Leonardo Da Vinci's intent was. This will keep you busy for a while. It can be even more fun doing this with a friend, with both of you guessing together, or giving each other competing viewpoints.
  4. Find a painting that really appeals to you. Try to notice all the details of the painting, and determine what they might mean. For instance, if a painting is a family portrait, and only one person is wearing black, it might mean that this particular person was dead at the time of the painting. Asking "what if…" expands your assumptions.
  5. Find a statue. If there is a large crowd, find someone who looks like the statue. If you're with a friend, you can try posing as the statue.
  6. Look at a scenery painting. Try to imagine someone you know in the scene, and imagine them doing different things. You can add other people, and see what you can come up with. For some more fun, you could start out with putting your best friend in, and then add famous people such as Albert Einstein, Carrie Underwood, etc.
  7. Look at installation art. This can be mind-boggling and mind-expanding all at once. Think about what the artist is trying to convey - what could possibly be going through the artist's mind? Think about how the installation impacts you, and whether you agree with it being termed art or not.
  8. Do not touch. So many people go through museums that touching is not allowed in order to preserve the items for future visitors. Imagine how quickly everything would be destroyed if touching objects were allowed!
Information Museums
  1. In most major cultural centers, information museums are no longer the dull, lifeless places of yore. Museums everywhere are now actively trying to be interactive places of learning, allowing visitors to touch, play with, and experience many of the displays. Look for the most interactive information museums when you make your decision to visit a museum, as this will increase the likelihood that you're going to have an absolutely fantastic time visiting the museum -- from natural history to aviation museums, there are many possibilities open to you.
  2. Find something you like on arrival. When you first arrive, ask for the map. Locate the places on the map of interest to you - usually there will be at least one thing that catches your eye. For instance, if you like dinosaurs, go to the fossil section, or any area that is specially set aside for dinosaur displays. If you find several things of interest, plan your time and movements accordingly to make sure that you don't miss seeing all of the attractions.
  3. Get interactive. Find the interactive features for each exhibit and interact; play the games, watch the stories, move things around, test your knowledge, and generally get involved. You'll find you learn a lot more by doing this than simply reading the information plaques.
  4. Take photos. Check that you are allowed to do so first, as the rules vary from museum to museum. Let a friend take a picture of you with the Tyrannosaurus Rex. With a little bit of knowledge of angles, you can make it seem like you are petting the dinosaur's head, or getting eaten by it!
  5. Visit specific areas of the museum and look for certain items. Making the visit into a bit of a seek-and-find hunt can really turn it into an exciting occasion. Here are some possible ideas:
    • Visit the geology section. Find your favorite color stone. Find your birth stone. You can even read about where the rocks were found and learn about how geologists tell the ages of rocks from their features.
    • Visit the animal section. Look for the largest and smallest stuffed animal. Look for the oldest mammal and the smallest mammal. Look for the bird with the most colorful feathers and the bird with the strangest habits (such as collecting all things blue).
    • Visit the astronomy section. Find the largest star. Find the youngest galaxy. Learn all that you can about black holes. Learn about star clusters in constellations.
    • Visit the section detailing disasters in your country or region. Find the largest or worst disaster. Was it natural or human-made? Was it avoidable or completely unexpected? Is it likely to happen again and if so, what can you do to protect yourself?
  6. Listen to the descriptions. Most museums have headphones that you can rent, and plug them into the little hole next to an exhibit. This will help a lot if you don't enjoy reading descriptions.
  7. Some museums, such as the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC have entire wings dedicated to different civilizations of the past (ancient Greece and Rome, Egypt, the Americas, and Asian civilizations.) The Egyptian wing even has sections of ancient temples to walk through. It can be fun, entertaining, and very interesting to walk through them and try to imagine it from the point of view of the people who built them or lived there. Then, try walking through again, and imagine it from the point of view of the explorers and archeologists who uncovered them. You can do that with the smaller exhibits (which display jewelry, every day objects of the time, etc.)
Living Museums
  1. Living museums are museums where a certain era or occasion is re-enacted, right down to the staff wearing costumes of the period. It's very hard to not enjoy yourself at one of these, so aim for a visit to a living museum whenever you do have the chance.
  2. Check out what is on offer by way of live displays. There could be a wide range of things happening, from sword play to making rope the old-fashioned way. Mark down the different displays that interest you and be sure to get to each one on time. It's hard not to enjoy watching things happen right before you and it's a lesson that doesn't require reading.
  3. Try the local or era-specific foods. Some living museums offer food made from the period and often you can watch it being cooked or baked, and then sample it. This can be a great way to experience what sorts of things people used to eat.
  4. Dress up if you can. If the living museum provides dressing up costumes for you try, get right into the action. Have a friend take photos and spend time walking around the complex in your costume, pretending to blend into the era and surroundings for a short time.
  5. Imagine what it must have been like to have lived during the times depicted by the living museum. Would you have been happy? Would you have been able to keep warm enough? Would the food have been to your liking? Would you have enjoyed going to school or to work in those times? Compare how wealthy and poor people lived in those times; compare their lifestyles with how we live today.
Transportation Museums
  1. Transportation museums can cover all types of transport including aviation, shipping, trams, buses, and cars. Enthusiasts of any type of vehicle will always find something to entertain them at such a museum but if you find yourself not so enthused, here are some fun things to do as well.
  2. Get on board! If the display allows you to clamber on board a ship, a bus, a plane, take the opportunity. This can be really fun as you explore the decks, the cockpit, the steering, the sleeping quarters, etc., of each type of transport.
  3. Take a trip. Some transportation museums have running, working versions of old transportation for you to try. This is a great way to take the weight off your legs and simply sit down and enjoy the ride! Trains, boats, and model trains are often used for this purpose.
  4. Think about the people who used to fly, drive, steer, navigate, or work with the transport items you're viewing. Transport is a great way to learn about the history of your city or region because it affects people in so many ways - working for transportation companies, getting to work, traveling on vacation, being rescued, etc. It can be a very visual way of building a picture in your own mind about the past of your hometown or country.

Video

{{Video:Entertain Yourself in a Museum|Whether you love museums or have to be dragged by your hair, having a plan will make the experience more enjoyable. Keep an open mind, but don't force yourself to look at things you don't necessarily like.don't go if u r not interested in history!

Tips

  • Don't visit exhibits that you might not be able to handle. If you're terrified of dinosaurs, maybe you shouldn't visit the dinosaur section. This also goes if you are squeamish. Some museum sections have very graphic displays, such as the Body Worlds exhibition. For some people, it is culturally disrespectful to view mummified, etc., bodies of the dead. If you are hesitant about visiting an exhibit that might have too much graphic content or be unsettling, ask a museum employee for a brief description of the area. If you are a parent, make sure that all exhibits are appropriate for your children before visiting them.
  • Always check opening days and times. Some museums are shut on traditional days, such as Mondays, depending on where you are in the world. Another benefit of checking opening times is to find out when museums offer free or reduced price entrance, or special event days or nights.
  • International Museum Day is May 18, 2010, and is usually celebrated on or around this date every year. It's a good excuse to get out and enjoy your local museum culture.
  • Dress comfortably. Shoes that you enjoy walking in are a must, as is being warm or cool enough.
  • Take snacks if you can't afford the prices in the cafe, or you don't want to wait in line too long. Be sure to eat them only where permitted though - crumbs on the displays might not be appreciated.

Warnings

  • Do not climb on the displays. An alarm will most likely go off, and you'll end up being warned off by security.
  • Don't bring your children to anything scary. They will most likely not enjoy looking at the diagram of a guillotine, and watching a video on how it works. Also beware of interactive rides - these can really frighten some children - ask in advance if you can get a refund for a child that balks at staying on the ride.

Related wikiHows


Sources and Citations

  1. Wikipedia, Museums
  2. About.com, How to Enjoy a Museum
  3. A great place to start is The Metropolitan Museum of Art's Museum Kids website

How to Safely Tour Egypt as a Woman Traveling Alone


Steps

  1. Surf the web and search for the best tour operators in Egypt.
  2. Deal with trusted tour operators to insure a private, well secured tour.
  3. Identify the habits and customs in the east Arab society and respect them.
  4. Follow the safety instructions.

Tips

  • Cairo has an arid desert climate, where the days are hot but the nights are relatively cool. Sandstorms are frequent in April and May. Humidity levels tend to rise come August. Winters in Egypt are great, especially in the months of February and March. The weather at this time is mild, with occasional rainfall.

How to Enjoy Your Vacation in South Africa

South Africa is by far one of the favorite holiday destinations in the world. The country offers you a great variety of scenic sights and wonders, flavored by diversity of the many different ethnic cultures. A land of tradition and history amidst a highly cosmopolitan society and golden sunsets. English is spoken throughout the country and communicating with the locals becomes an added advantage, making your stay as pleasant and memorable as possible.

Steps

  1. Convert your currency into South African Rands. Although foreigners may use travelers cheques or U.S Dollars, trading becomes much easier when paying in South African Rands. This can be done easily at your convenience at any one of the many international and domestic airports.Many foreign exchange banks are also available at the major city centers. Ask for advice at the information desk, if you encounter any difficulties. Most hotels and holiday inns will accept credit cards or any international travel card.
  2. Hire a private tour guide if you can. Most hotels will provide you with a reputable taxi and tour guide to show you around the city and other interesting places one can visit. One can also use the city bus services, provided you carry a map and know where you intend on going. It is simple to ask for directions since most people will communicate in the English medium.
  3. You can choose a coastal destination if it is sun and surf you desire. South Africa has many miles of sandy sea shores that extends into many of the provinces. This shoreline starts from the Atlantic Ocean in the Cape and extends into the warm Indian Ocean that resides on the West side of the coastline. The exotic beaches and the warm sun indulges the luxuries of 5 star hospitality or self catering facilities, depending on your budget and preferences.
  4. Mingle with the locals to experience the novelty of true warmth and hospitality. The ethnic diversity of the country is an enchanting source of interest and mystery. Depending on where to choose to stay, the people are of a varied mix. You will most likely encounter the different race groups all living and working together as one.
  5. Capture the enchantment of mountain splendor in the interior of the country. The far interior and extreme north is sprawled with scattered mountain territory and valley of a thousand hills. The natural game parks and Eco-villages/parks are also situated in the interior of the country. The big 5, Rhino, lions, buffalo, Giraffe etc can be seen in abundance at any of the nature reserves.
  6. Dress appropriately in accordance with the seasonal weather. South Africa experiences a cold and chilly Winter from late April to the first week in August. Temperatures in the interior and the Cape can range between 3-5 degrees at night and increases to around 10-11 degrees during the Day. The mountain winds can be icy in the Cape province so be sure to dress warmly when visiting in the Winter. Areas along the north of the country, such as Durban places that extend further north experience much warmer weather and the Winter is quite warm. Be sure to dress appropriately in order to make your stay comfortable.
  7. Indulge yourself in the taste of South African cuisine. Food and drinks range from fresh fruit cocktails to best brewed white and red wines. The cuisine differs from truly ethnic to Oriental or English dishes prepared by the locals. All types of foods are available as this will once again depend on your eating preferences.
  8. Visit the many breath taking Botanical Gardens located in the vicinity of each City or Town. These gardens host a splendor of indigenous trees and flowers endemic to the South African Climate and conditions. Experience the calm and tranquility amidst this natural beauty and awe. These gardens can be easily accessed by taxi or public transport. Coffee shops and finger lunches are also available within the confines of the gardens that are available at an affordable price.
  9. Choose an economic Airline for travel. South African Airways is a member of the star alliance group, giving you credit on your travel miles. However most other airlines travel daily to and from South Africa's major international airports. These include Air Emirates, Ethihad Airlines ( Abu Dhabi ), Egypt Air, Ethiopian Airlines, Air France and an option of many other airlines that travel regularly into the country.

Tips

    • Take care of your passport and other travel documents when travelling in any foreign country. Should you encounter any hassles or problems contact your embassy which should be available in the Capital City of Pretoria.
  • Embrace the warmth and beauty of the country and its people in order truly enjoy your stay in the country. Be willing to explore as much as you can. You may discover something magnificent to take back home with you.
  • You will require a Visiting Visa in order to enter the country. Visas are not issued on site. You will have to apply for one in advance before flying into the country.
  • Please note that no food or alien plants are allowed from foreign soil. Be sure to throw these away before entering.
  • Follow the rules when in the country. The South African Police services enforce strict penalties to those who break the law.